Archive for ‘And that’s no joke’

January 5, 2016

I might regret this…

by Janie Jones

I made a very delicious meatloaf on the 26th of December. I thought the spud would help me eat the leftovers before she went back to her dad’s, but apparently, although this child was the one who requested I make the meatloaf in the first place and ate quite heartily of it at its first dinner table appearance, she was too good for meatloaf leftovers.

I ate on it myself several times last week, then went out to the farm for the weekend. Today I realized there was still one piece left in the fridge. It was 10 days old and past my standard rule of 7 days of eating on leftovers before they get pitched. But it was a very, very delicious meatloaf. So I decided to take my chances and eat it anyway.

If I die of food poisoning, now you will know why.

Beware the 10 day old meatloaf.

BEWARE!!

November 22, 2015

Eeeewwww!

by Janie Jones

There is a message board by the door at the house where I am renting.  This morning the following was scrawled upon the board:

Please clean up pubes after grooming.

Thank the merciful heavens I have my own bathroom.

November 18, 2015

What’s the matter with you?

by Janie Jones

Due today:  Biochemistry lab report on the inhibition kinetics of lactate dehydrogenase.

Due tomorrow:  Rough draft of paper on the epistatic gene inheritance of GloFish.

Due Friday:  Rough draft of the presentation on the immune evasion properties of sGP in Ebola virus.

Monday:  Genetics exam on gene transcription, translation, operons and gene regulation.

Due next Wednesday:  Term paper on ten weeks of study encompassing seven laboratory experiments on lactate dehydrogenase and my final Ebola sGP presentation.

didi at typewriter

 

Oh, yeah.  And a bunch of other “small” homework assignments are also due between now and then.  If you find me either asleep on my laptop, or electrocuted from the tears of frustration and exhaustion I cry while I type, you will now know why.

November 9, 2015

Does anyone else find this a bit ridiculous?

by Janie Jones

A photo from the parking lot where I do a lot of grocery shopping:  Phone download oct 22_2015 004 edit

October 25, 2015

Number of hours in the weekend: 48

by Janie Jones

Hours spent doing homework:  30.

biochem cry to sleep

October 16, 2015

Malapropisms

by Janie Jones

So this morning I attended my biochemistry lecture where we were talking about how nucleic acids form DNA, translating DNA and protein coding within genes.  After that I attended my genetics lecture where we were discussing chromosome inversions and how they can cause crossover errors during meiosis resulting in lost genes and non viable gametes.  And, now I have just finished my Virology lab where we were preparing unknown samples of virus for DNA analysis and headed down to work.  Once there I turned on my laptop for some tunes and the radio website asked if I wanted to change my genre preferences.

Only I thought it read change my gene preferences.

Considering I just spent most of the day in lab and class talking about DNA, genetic material and genes, I think it makes perfect sense that I’d read change gene preferences.  Don’t you?

 

October 2, 2015

Constellations in my Borrelia

by Janie Jones

So, do any of you ever wonder what I do when I’m in my Lyme Studies lab?

I know, you have been dying to know!

Mostly I count Borrelia burgdorferi, the primary bacteria responsible for Lyme disease in the U.S.  There are other Borrelia species that also cause Lyme disease, but most are not found in my neck of the woods.

In general Borrelia are thin spiral shaped bacteria that swim about independently.  However, they do also form clusters of varying size.  I don’t know why for sure, and I don’t know if anyone else does either.  They might and I just haven’t stumbled on that information yet.

Anyway, I am responsible for a strain that has been genetically engineered to express a green fluorescent protein that makes it glow green.  This has many practical applications, it makes them much easier to see for sure, it also makes it easier to tell if the bacteria is alive as dead bacteria don’t make glowing green protein, they don’t make anything if they are dead.

So every week I gaze into a microscope and check for itsy-bitsy green lines on a field of black.  A healthy bacteria culture has millions or even billions of the little critters all swirling about doing their little bacteria thing.  Often there are so many it looks like the depths of outer space, if the stars, planets, galaxies and nebulae were all fluorescent green anyway.  To see them well it is best to turn off the lights in the lab to reduce the ambient light which can interfere with catching a glimpse of the faint green glow, so it really does often feel like star gazing through binoculars.  The other day it so strongly put me in mind of star gazing that I started looking for shapes in the “constellations” of bacteria.

Lo an behold I found Ursa Major!

Teddy bear Bb edit png

I think I just discovered the evolution of Bear-relia!